thecomplexityofcameron said: Do you have an Instagram account? If so, follow me: afilmbycam

I’ll definitely follow!

I love the person I’ve become, because I fought to become her.

Kaci Diane

undr:

Martin Munkácsi
Three Boys at Lake Tanganyika, 1929

undr:

Martin Munkácsi

Three Boys at Lake Tanganyika, 1929

maihudson:

Pina Bausch, Tanzteather Wuppertal, 1973.
"It began with controversy; in 1973 Pina Bausch was appointed director of dance for the Wuppertal theatres and the form she developed in those early years, a mixture of dance and theatre, was wholly unfamiliar. In her performances the players did not merely dance; they spoke, sang - and sometimes they cried or laughed too. But this strange new work succeeded in establishing itself. […] Dance theatre evolved into a unique genre, inspiring choreographers throughout the world and influencing theatre and classical ballet too.” +

maihudson:

Pina Bausch, Tanzteather Wuppertal, 1973.

"It began with controversy; in 1973 Pina Bausch was appointed director of dance for the Wuppertal theatres and the form she developed in those early years, a mixture of dance and theatre, was wholly unfamiliar. In her performances the players did not merely dance; they spoke, sang - and sometimes they cried or laughed too. But this strange new work succeeded in establishing itself. […] Dance theatre evolved into a unique genre, inspiring choreographers throughout the world and influencing theatre and classical ballet too.” +

Rarely Used Words…

sough (v.) to moan, to rustle, to sigh;
           (n.) the gentle, soothing murmur of wind or water
dirl (v.) to thrill, to vibrate, to penetrate; to tremble or quiver 
effleurage (v.) “to stroke as one would a flower”
                 (n.) a series of light stroking touches
cafuné (v.) running your fingers through your lover’s hair
cataglottism (n.) kissing with tongue

Daydreaming

His lips were on my neck as he stood behind me, his hands roaming my body. They drive me crazy in their path, exploring my shape, pulling at my clothes to bare my skin, his unbridled passion for me dancing in his fingertips. I was panting, my hands reaching behind me to run through his hair, gripping it, suddenly as I gasped, his hands having made it to my underwear as he whispered my name in my ear…

Title: You're A Sweet Sweet Man Artist: Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin You’re A Sweet Man

I don’t care what they say
I don’t care what they do
Take all of my loving
Come on and get it…

…When you kiss me
I have to give on in
But I tried hard not to let it show
But then you hold on and you kiss me again
Hold it right there I got to have you I swear

#Music  

lostinurbanism:

A Sunday Kinfolk Story (Intro and Casting) + Hamilton Multimedia, LLC 

       ”What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?” 

Written by D. VerrtahMarcus Smith (Behind The Lens), Russell Hamilton (Multimedia), King Texas (Creative Director) and myself, Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Lost in Urbanism + Sunday Kinfolk)

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we explore the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

Visit Sunday Kinfolk to get additional information on casting and creative collaborations with this project.
cavetocanvas:

Jacob Lawrence, The Library, 1960
From the Smithsonian Museum of American Art:

Jacob Lawrence researched many of his paintings of African American events by reading history books and novels. Looking back at his high school years, he remembered that black culture was “never studied seriously like regular subjects,” and so he had to teach himself by visiting libraries and museums (Lawrence, 1940, Downtown Gallery Papers, Archives of American Art, quoted in Wheat, Jacob Lawrence, American Painter, 1986). This colorful view of a crowded reading room may show the 135th Street Library—-now the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture—-where the country’s  first significant collection of African American literature, history, and prints opened in 1925. Everybody appears absorbed in their books, and the standing figure in the front looking at African art may represent the artist as a young man, delving deeper into his heritage.

cavetocanvas:

Jacob Lawrence, The Library, 1960

From the Smithsonian Museum of American Art:

Jacob Lawrence researched many of his paintings of African American events by reading history books and novels. Looking back at his high school years, he remembered that black culture was “never studied seriously like regular subjects,” and so he had to teach himself by visiting libraries and museums (Lawrence, 1940, Downtown Gallery Papers, Archives of American Art, quoted in Wheat, Jacob Lawrence, American Painter, 1986). This colorful view of a crowded reading room may show the 135th Street Library—-now the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture—-where the country’s  first significant collection of African American literature, history, and prints opened in 1925. Everybody appears absorbed in their books, and the standing figure in the front looking at African art may represent the artist as a young man, delving deeper into his heritage.

(via chellydarlinggg)

#Fine Art  
4woodennickels:

Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee

4woodennickels:

Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee

dorothydandridge:

Harry Belafonte as David Boyeur and Dorothy Dandridge as Margot Seaton in the 1957 film, Island in the Sun.

dorothydandridge:

Harry Belafonte as David Boyeur and Dorothy Dandridge as Margot Seaton in the 1957 film, Island in the Sun.

I fall in love with people’s passion. The way their eyes light up when they talk about the thing they love and the way they fill with light.

Life is Beautiful - A Date Blessed by the Virgin Mary 

Guido: I forgot to tell you.

Dora: Go ahead.

Guido: You can’t imagine how much I feel like making love to you. But I’ll never tell anyone, especially not you. They’d have to torture me to make me say it.

Dora: Say what?

Guido: That I want to make love to you, not just once, over and over again! But I’ll never tell you that. I’d have to be crazy to tell you I’d even make love to you now… right here, for the rest of my life.

<333

I can’t let you go now. I want to go places with you; obscure little places, just to be able to say: here I came with her.

Anaïs Nin

She did not need much, wanted very little. A kind word, sincerity, fresh air, clean water, a garden, kisses, books to read, sheltering arms, a cosy bed, and to love and be loved in return.

Starra Neely Blade